‘I Give a Shirt!’ goodwill campaign ready for another run

Goodwill stakeholders and city officials hold the tags which will go on bags during the second edition of the 'I Give a Shirt!' campaign, outside city hall on Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. Pictured are Baldwin House Public Educator Danielle MacNeil, Cornwall Waste Management Supervisor Danielle Watson, Salvation Army Program Coordinator Julie Leroux, Cornwall Environmental Analyst Dave Kuhn and Agape Center Executive Director Johanne Couture. The goodwill curbside pickup goes Oct. 15-21, 2018. (Newswatch Group/Bill Kingston)

CORNWALL – An event aimed at keeping textiles out of the city’s landfill while helping the less fortunate is gearing up for another run later this month.

Goodwill stakeholders and city officials met Thursday afternoon to make final plans for the second annual “I Give a Shirt!” campaign. The Salvation Army, Agape Center and Baldwin House/Serendipity Boutique are taking part.

It will be held Oct. 15-19, 2018 during the 17th annual Waste Reduction Week, where Cornwallites will put out clearly marked bags of gently-used clothing on their regular garbage and recycling day.

The curbside collections, done by agency volunteers, will go to the different agencies: Baldwin House on Monday, the Sally Ann on Tuesday and Thursday, Agape on Wednesday and Friday.

In order to make sure your donation doesn’t end up in the trash, you have to put a label on the bag for pickup. Click here for a PDF of the label to print.

Agape Center Executive Director Johanne Couture says it’s the end of summer so they’re seeing an influx of the summer items. But the real need is for winter coats, blankets and warm linens.

Baldwin House Public Educator Danielle MacNeil added that even items that need “slight repairs,” like a missing button or lose hem, are items they’re looking for. Some that can’t be sold in the boutique would be part of their Giving Tree outside the Second Street West shop.

While the name is ‘I Give A Shirt’, Cornwall Waste Management Supervisor Danielle Watson wants the public to know it’s more than just shirts they’re looking to collect.

Last year, the campaign collected 5,000 pounds (2,300 kilograms) of items and organizers are hoping to match or better that result.

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